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Volume 18 (1); March 2019
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Review
Injury Mechanism to Induce Traumatic Balance Disorder
Jeong Wook Kang, Jae-Yong Byun
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(1):1-7.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.1.1
  • 7,254 View
  • 124 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Many of the dizziness patients annually visit ENT (ear, nose, throat) clinics because the vestibular function is the major organ to keep body balance and belongs to the Otorhinolaryngology. Nevertheless, many otolaryngologists feel that it is not easy to access the dizziness patients. The reason is that dizziness is not a final diagnosis and it is necessary to start the diagnosis of dizziness and find out the cause. Also, the causes of dizziness belong to multiple medical departments. That is why we need to pay more attention. Among them, traumatic vertigo can be manifested in various ways depending on the injury site and mechanism, and it is often difficult to predict the medical prognosis. Therefore, this review article focuses on traumatic vertigo. In this paper, we discussed its epidemiology and mechanism to help clinicians to treat patients with traumatic vertigo.
Original Articles
Analysis of Age-Dependent Normative Values of Suppression Video-Head-Impulse Test in Healthy Korean Subjects
Do Yoon Jeong, Yoon Sik Park, Sung Il Cho
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(1):8-13.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.1.8
  • 4,849 View
  • 87 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Suppression head impulse paradigm (SHIMP) in video head impulse test is now newly used to test vestibular function. The aim of this study was to analyze normative values of SHIMP for healthy Korean subjects in each decade of life.
Methods
SHIMP and HIMP responses were measured with the video head impulse test in 70 healthy subjects. Vestibulo-ocular reflex gain and anticompensatory saccade were analyzed and compared at each decade of life.
Results
All subjects produced anticompensatory saccades in SHIMP. Gain values did not vary significantly with age. Gain values in SHIMP were lower than gain values in HIMP. The gain values of rightward impulse were higher than the gain values of leftward impulse.
Conclusions
Gain values and anticompensatory saccades in SHIMP were consistently equal in each decade of life. Normative values of SHIMP seems largely unaffected by aging.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Normalization of the Suppression Head Impulse Test (SHIMP) and its correlation with the Head Impulse Test (HIMP) in healthy adults
    Suheda Baran, Gulce Kirazli, Pelin Pistav Akmese, Nese Celebisoy, Tayfun Kirazli
    Journal of Vestibular Research.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
The Effect, Compliance and Satisfaction of Customized Vestibular Rehabilitation: A Single Center Experience
Hyung Lee, Hyun Ah Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(1):14-18.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.1.14
  • 5,178 View
  • 102 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Over the last decades, numerous studies on the effect of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) have been reported in western countries, but there has been no report about real experiences of customized VR in Korea. The aim of this study was to analyze of the efficacy, compliance and satisfaction in patients with acute and chronic dizziness.
Methods
Patients with dizziness were treated with a customized VR at least 4 weeks. Subjects were assessed before and after at least 4 weeks of customized VR for visual analogue scale (VAS) and disability scale (DS). Patients were asked to score the satisfaction of their treatment as 1 (very poor) to 5 (excellent). Compliance to exercise program were graded as 1 (regularly performed), 2 (frequently performed), or 3 (rarely performed).
Results
Thirty-two patients with dizziness were included. Diagnosis of patients were vestibular migraine (n=5), Meniere’s disease (n=2), vestibular neuritis (n=10), persistent perceptual positional dizziness (n=10), bilateral vestibulopathy (n=3), and central dizziness (n=2). Mean VAS and DS before VR were 15.3 and 2.4, respectively. Mean VAS and DS after VR were 4.5 and 0.7, respectively. Significant improvements in VAS and DS were observed after VR (p=0.00). Mean treatment satisfaction score was 3.3±1.0 and mean compliance score was 2.3±0.8. Satisfaction to VR showed positive correlation with patient’s compliance. (p=0.00, r=0.644)
Conclusions
Significant improvements were seen in symptom and disability in patients with acute and chronic dizziness after customized VR. Patients showed moderate compliance to exercise program and overall satisfaction was fair.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Survey of Educational, Clinical Background in Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy of Korean Physical Therapists
    Migyoung Kweon, Youn Bum Sung
    The Journal of Korean Academy of Physical Therapy .2023; 30(2): 65.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Patient Satisfaction in Customized Vestibular Exercise: A Pilot Study
    Hye Soo Ryu, Min Young Lee, Jae Yun Jung, Ji Eun Choi
    Research in Vestibular Science.2019; 18(3): 71.     CrossRef
Case Report
Visuospatial Dysfunction in Patients With the Right Vestibular Neuritis
Seung-Ho Jeon, Ko-Woon Kim, Hyun-June Shin, Byoung-Soo Shin, Man-Wook Seo, Sun-Young Oh
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(1):19-23.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.1.19
  • 5,411 View
  • 85 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is characterized by acute/subacute vertigo with spontaneous nystagmus and unilateral loss of semicircular canal function. Vestibular system in human is represented in the brain bilaterally with functional asymmetries of the right hemispheric dominance in the right handers. Spatial working memory entails the ability to keep spatial information active in working memory over a short period of time which is also known as the right hemispheric dominance. Three patients (patient 1, 32-year-old female; patient 2, 18-year-old male; patient 3, 63-year-old male) suffered from acute onset of severe vertigo, nausea and vomiting. Patients 1 and 2’s examination revealed VN on the right side showing spontaneous left beating nystagmus and impaired vestibular ocular reflex on the right side in video head-impulse and caloric tests. Patient 3’s finding was fit for VN on the left side. We also evaluated visuospatial memory function with the block design test in these 3 VN patients which discovered lower scores in patients 1 and 2 and the average level in patient 3 compare to those of healthy controls. Follow-up block design test after resolved symptoms showed within normal range in both patients. Our cases suggest that the patients with unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy may have an asymmetrical effect on the higher vestibular cognitive function. The right VN can be associated with transient visuospatial memory dysfunction. These findings add the evidence of significant right hemispheric dominance for vestibular and visuospatial structures in the right-handed subjects, and of predominant dysfunction in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the peripheral lesion side.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Differential Effects of Acute Right- vs. Left-Sided Vestibular Deafferentation on Spatial Cognition in Unilateral Labyrinthectomized Mice
    Thanh Tin Nguyen, Gi-Sung Nam, Jin-Ju Kang, Gyu Cheol Han, Ji-Soo Kim, Marianne Dieterich, Sun-Young Oh
    Frontiers in Neurology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Essay
The 4th Joint Meeting of Japan Society of Equilibrium Research and Korean Balance Society: A Conference Report
Ho Yun Lee, Kyu-Sung Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2019;18(1):24-26.   Published online March 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2019.18.1.24
  • 3,810 View
  • 43 Download
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Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science