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Volume 9 Suppl 1 June 2010
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Research in Vestibular Scinece의 한국연구재단 등재 경과 및 새로운 온라인 투고시스템
Kyu-Sung Kim1, Seong-Ki Ahn2,3
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):1-13.
  • 1,644 View
  • 14 Download
PDF
Anatomy and Physiology of Vestibulo-ocular Reflex
Sung Huhn Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):19-24.
  • 1,982 View
  • 32 Download
PDF
Spontaneous and Gaze-evoked Nystagmus
Lee Hyung
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):25-31.
  • 1,951 View
  • 51 Download
PDF
Positional and Positioning Nystagmus
Jong Dae Lee
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):32-37.
  • 2,532 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Positional/positioning nystagmus occurs predominantly with specific head positions. The nystagmus can be attributed to either peripheral or central vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal postional vertigo (BPPV) is by far the most common cause of the nystagmus, accounting for about 90% of patients. Most central forms of positional vertigo involve the region around the vestibular nuclei and a neuronal loop to the cerebellar vermis. Positional/positioning tests should be performed in all patients with vertigo.
Head-shaking Nystagmus and Vibration-induced Nystagmus
Jae Ho Ban
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):38-40.
  • 2,054 View
  • 17 Download
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Valsalva and Hyperventilation induced Nystagmus
Kwang-Dong Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):41-44.
  • 4,827 View
  • 101 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hyperventilation may elicit nystagmus by bring out vestibular asymmetry in central as well as peripheral vestibulopathies, including compensated peripheral vestibulopathies, perilymph fistula, acoustic neuroma, lesions at craniocervical junction, and cerebellar degeneration. A recent study documented that hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HIN) beating to the side of reduced caloric response, hearing impairment, or abnormal auditory brainstem response may be a valuable sign for bedside detection of acoustic neuroma. Disruption of the central pathways compensating for a peripheral imbalance, increased neuronal excitability, changes in intracranial pressure, and metabolic changes on cerebellar calcium channels are potential mechanisms for the generation of HIN. The Valsalva maneuver may also produce vertigo and nystagmus in patients with craniocervical junction anomalies, perilymph fistula, and canal dehiscence syndromes. Presumably, Valsalva maneuver increases intracranial or tympanic pressure and exerts force directly at the site of the fistula or dehiscence, causing deflection of the cupula of the involved semicircular canal.
Diagnosis and Managment of Acute Spontaneous Vertigo
Tae-Kyeong Lee, Ji-Yun Park
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):45-50.
  • 2,021 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Acute dizziness can be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. The pattern of acute spontaneous vertigo without any sign of brainstem abnormality i.e acute isolated vertigo, includes both of benign peripheral and sinister central disorders. Although the majority of the acute isolated vertigo are the benign peripheral vestibulopathy such as vestibular neuritis, some of the central disorders especially, cerebellar stroke can appear to be quite similar to benign peripheral one. Among them, "pseudovestibular neuritis" by acute infarction in the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (mPICA), "psudolabyrintitis" by anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, "pseudo-benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (p-BPPV)" by cerebellar vermal infarction, and vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) occasionally harass physicians. Common benign peripheral disorders have unique clinical features allowing for bedside diagnosis. Therefore, if the presentation is not typical for a peripheral vestibular disorder, the possibility of the central disorder should be considered. Careful history and focused neurolotologic examinations including pattern of nystagmus, head thrust test, head shaking test, and severity of imbalance provide the key information for distinguishing benign peripheral causes from life-threatening central disorders.
Episodic Vertigo
Jae Yun Jung
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):51-54.
  • 1,826 View
  • 10 Download
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Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Jae Yong Byun, Eun Woong Ryu
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):55-64.
  • 1,837 View
  • 27 Download
PDF
Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Dizziness
Sun-Young Oh, Ph.D
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):65-71.
  • 1,888 View
  • 49 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Chronic dizziness has several common causes, including anxiety disorders, migraine, traumatic brain injuries, and dysautonomia, that require different treatments. Key features of the clinical history distinguish these illness from one another and from active neurotologic conditions. In this review article, the expanded differential diagnosis of chronic dizziness was discussed and treatments including vestibular rehabilitation were described. .
Surgical Treatment of Vertiginous Diseases
Won-Ho Chung, Il Joon Moon
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):72-79.
  • 1,572 View
  • 9 Download
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Vasoactive Peptides Influence Inner Ear Uptake of Gentamicin
Ja-Won Koo1, Peter S. Steyger2
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):83-91.
  • 1,504 View
  • 10 Download
PDF
Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials
Seong-Ki Ahn1,2, Dong Gu Hur1,2, Seong-Yong Ahn1
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):97-102.
  • 1,546 View
  • 21 Download
PDF
Tests for Dysautonomia in Dizziness
Tae-Kyeong Lee, Ji-Yun Park, Ki-Bum Sung
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):103-110.
  • 2,867 View
  • 80 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The influence of the vestibular system on autonomic responses is well known, as seeing that the autonomic symptoms such as pallor, nausea, and sweating are commonly observed during acute vestibular vertigo attacks. Thinking about the convergence of autonomic and vestibular afferents to the solitary nucleus and being integrated in reticular formation, it is taken to be granted that autonomic and vestibular systems are interacted each other. In this respect, several studies using the tests for the demonstration of the abnormalities in the autonomic nervous system have demonstrated the autonomic dysfunction in the wide range of vestibular disorders. The fluctuation of the blood pressure and the heart rate by head-up tilt test (HUTT) to show the cardiovascular challenges have been widely studied and showed significant results. At the same time, it has also been proposed that autonomic dysfunction can be the etiological background in some portion of the dizziness and vertigo. It is uncertain whether the autonomic dysfunction can directly cause the vertigo or the autonomic symptoms are simply caused by vestibular vertigo. However, by using the well-known, non-invasive, and simple autonomic tests, causative relationship of these two systems can be more validated. In this paper, methods for the autonomic function tests and the reported evidence demonstrating the relationship between autonomic derangement and vestibular disorders are reviewed.
The Principles of Stacked Auditory Brainstem Response and Cochlear Hydrops Analysis Masking Procedure
Chae-Bong Lim, Kyu-Sung Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2010;9(Suppl 1):111-116.
  • 1,571 View
  • 7 Download
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Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science