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Case Report
A Case of Delayed Audiovestibulopathy after Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke
Hyun Su Lee, Eun Kyung Jeon, Dong Hwan Kwon, Tae Hoon Kong
Res Vestib Sci. 2023;22(3):77-82.   Published online September 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2023.22.3.77
  • 1,109 View
  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Distinguishing central and peripheral causes of dizziness is vital. A case is presented where a 42-year-old man with a history of posterior circulation ischemic stroke developed acute unilateral vestibulopathy with hearing loss. Clinical examination revealed signs of vestibular dysfunction on the left side. Audiometry confirmed deafness on the left, but imaging ruled out new central issues. The patient was diagnosed with audiovestibulopathy and treated with steroids, antiviral agents, intratympanic injections, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hearing loss persisted, but dizziness improved with vestibular rehabilitation. Poststroke patients should be closely monitored for peripheral complications. Further research should explore the benefits of antiplatelet therapy in vascular-related conditions, even without clear central lesions.
Review
Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness: Overview and Diagnostic Criteria
Sung-Hee Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2020;19(2):42-48.   Published online June 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2020.19.2.42
  • 8,035 View
  • 316 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Persistent postural perceptual dizziness (PPPD) is a chronic functional vestibular disorder that manifests with 3 or more months of dizziness, nonspinning vertigo, and unsteadiness. These main symptoms are exacerbated by upright posture, active or passive self-motion, and exposure to visual stimuli. PPPD is usually precipitated by illnesses that cause vertigo, dizziness, or unsteadiness. The common precipitants are acute or episodic peripheral vestibular diseases including vestibular neuritis, Meniere disease, or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. PPPD is not a diagnosis of exclusion. An abnormal finding on examination or laboratory testing does not necessarily exclude a diagnosis of PPPD. This article reviewed the Bárány Society’s diagnostic criteria for PPPD in detail and discussed directions of future investigations.
Case Report
A Case of Patient with Meniere’s Disease Who Presented Periodic Alternating Nystagmus
Jin Woo Park, Ja Won Gu, Mee Hyun Song, Dae Bo Shim
Res Vestib Sci. 2016;15(3):80-83.   Published online September 15, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2016.15.3.80
  • 7,782 View
  • 114 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Periodic alternating nystagmus (PAN) is a spontaneous horizontal jerky nystagmus that reverses its direction periodically with a quiescent interval. PAN has been reported in acquired and congenital forms. The main lesion site of the acquired form of PAN has been attributed to the caudal brainstem or cerebellum. Herein we report a 63-year-old male patient with Meniere’s disease, who presented PAN during a vertigo attack. The patient demonstrated no abnormality on neurologic evaluation and brain imaging, which is different feature compared to the central or congenital form of PAN. It should be kept in mind that peripheral vestibular disorders such as Meniere’s disease can produce PAN.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science