Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
14 "Sudden hearing loss"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Article
Comparison of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials between low and high tone idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss
Sang-Wook Park, Sang Yun Lee, Somi Ryu, Jung Woo Lee, Chae Dong Yim, Dong Gu Hur, Seong-Ki Ahn
Res Vestib Sci. 2024;23(1):11-15.   Published online March 15, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2024.001
  • 724 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) have been reported to be useful in evaluating not only vestibular function but also the prognosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) patients. Even though low frequency, high frequency, and all frequency-involved ISSNHL groups tend to show varied clinical characteristics, there is a lack of data using VEMP results to analyze these subgroups. We investigated if the VEMP test is a valuable tool to predict recovery from hearing loss in association with different frequencies.
Methods
A total of 26 ISSNHL patients were divided into three different groups impaired with low tone (ascending type), high tone (descending type), and all tones (flat type) based on the initial audiograms. Each group included five, 10, and 11 patents, respectively, and their VEMP results were compared between the three subgroups.
Results
Abnormal VEMP results were found in five of the total 26 ISSNHL patients (19.2%). Two (40.0%), one (10.0%), and two (18.1%) patients of low tone, high tone, and all tone hearing loss groups, respectively, showed abnormal VEMP results. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the three groups.
Conclusions
Even though VEMP is known as a valuable tool for predicting the prognosis of ISSNHL patients, it does not seem to reflect frequency-sensitive aspects of ISSNHL.
Case Report
A Case of Delayed Audiovestibulopathy after Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke
Hyun Su Lee, Eun Kyung Jeon, Dong Hwan Kwon, Tae Hoon Kong
Res Vestib Sci. 2023;22(3):77-82.   Published online September 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2023.22.3.77
  • 1,109 View
  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Distinguishing central and peripheral causes of dizziness is vital. A case is presented where a 42-year-old man with a history of posterior circulation ischemic stroke developed acute unilateral vestibulopathy with hearing loss. Clinical examination revealed signs of vestibular dysfunction on the left side. Audiometry confirmed deafness on the left, but imaging ruled out new central issues. The patient was diagnosed with audiovestibulopathy and treated with steroids, antiviral agents, intratympanic injections, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hearing loss persisted, but dizziness improved with vestibular rehabilitation. Poststroke patients should be closely monitored for peripheral complications. Further research should explore the benefits of antiplatelet therapy in vascular-related conditions, even without clear central lesions.
Original Articles
Re-fixation Saccade at Video-Head Impulse Test in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Dong Hyuk Jang, Sun Seong Kang, Hyun Joon Shim, Yong-Hwi An
Res Vestib Sci. 2023;22(2):46-51.   Published online June 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2023.22.2.46
  • 1,179 View
  • 31 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was performed to evaluate characteristics and their prognostic value of video-head impulse test (vHIT) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with vertigo.
Methods
Of the 612 patients with a diagnosis of SSNHL from 2010 to 2018, 110 patients (18.0%) with vertigo and 39 patients (6.4%) with vHIT results were recruited. The patients were evaluated for their pure-tone hearing average (at initial, 1-month, and 6-month visit), the presence of re-fixation saccade and gains at vHIT, the canal paresis (CP) at ccaloric test.
Results
Patients with saccade (+) showed higher pure-tone averages than those with saccade (‒) on initial and follow-up audiograms. The improvement in pure-tone averages was less in the saccade (+) group than in the saccade (‒) group. There was no significant difference of hearing recovery between SSNHL patients with normal gain and those with decreased gain. There was no difference of hearing improvement between CP (+) and CP (‒) groups according to the presence of re-fixation saccade.
Conclusions
Concurrent re-fixation saccade at vHIT is a negative prognostic factor of hearing function in SSNHL. Re-fixation saccade in SSNHL may suggest widespread damages to both the cochlea and the vestibule, leading to the poor prognosis.
Which Is More Important for the Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Vertigo, Canal Paresis or Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?
Yong-Hwi An, Hyun Joon Shim
Res Vestib Sci. 2021;20(3):101-107.   Published online September 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2021.20.3.101
  • 3,329 View
  • 55 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was performed to determine characteristics and the prognostic values in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) with comorbid ipsilateral canal paresis (CP) and/or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).
Methods
Of the 338 patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic SSNHL, 29 patients (8.6%) with CP and 24 patients (7.1%) with BPPV were recruited and compared to 23 patients with SSNHL and vertigo but without CP or BPPV. The patients were evaluated for their initial hearing threshold, type of canal involved, response to repositioning maneuvers, and hearing outcome for 6 months.
Results
Patients with CP (+) BPPV (‒) showed lower pure-tone averages than those with CP (‒) BPPV (+) on initial and follow-up audiograms. The improvement in pure-tone averages was less in the CP (+) BPPV (‒) group than in the CP (‒) BPPV (+) group. The improvement in speech discrimination scores was less in the CP (+) BPPV (‒) group than in the CP (‒) BPPV (‒) group. BPPV most commonly involved the posterior canal (15 of 24, 62.5%), followed by the horizontal canal (13 of 24, 54.2%). Three of 24 patients (12.5%) had recurrences of BPPV.
Conclusions
CP is a more serious sign for hearing recovery than BPPV, although both CP and BPPV are negative prognostic indicators of auditory function in SSNHL. Concurrent CP and/or BPPV in SSNHL suggest combined damage to the vestibule and may indicate severe and widespread labyrinthine damage, leading to a poor prognosis.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Re-fixation Saccade at Video-Head Impulse Test in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Dong Hyuk Jang, Sun Seong Kang, Hyun Joon Shim, Yong-Hwi An
    Research in Vestibular Science.2023; 22(2): 46.     CrossRef
Case Report
A Case of Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Vertigo during Epidural Nerve Block
Byeong Min Lee, Jin hong Noh, Seong Ki Ahn, Hyun Woo Park
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(4):170-174.   Published online December 21, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.4.170
  • 4,808 View
  • 78 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Epidural anesthesia has significantly advanced in neuraxial anesthesia and analgesia. It is used for surgical anaesthesia and treatment of chronic pain. Hearing loss during or after epidural anesthesia is rare, and it is known to occur by the change of the intracranial pressure. Cerebrospinal fluid is connected with perilymph in the cochlear and vestibule that is important to hearing and balance. If the intracranial pressure is abruptly transferred to the inner ear, perilymph can be leak, that called perilymphatic fistula, dizziness, and hearing loss can occur suddenly. We report a 65-year-old woman who presented with acute onset dizziness and hearing loss during the epidural nerve block for back pain, wherein we speculated a possibility of perilymphatic fistula as the mechanism of hearing loss and dizziness. The mechanism of dizziness and hearing loss was suspected with perilymphatic fistula.
Original Articles
Incidence of Progression into Ménière Disease from Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: Midterm Follow-up Study
Byeong Min Lee, Jin Hyun Seo, Hyun Woo Park, Hyun Jin Lee, Dong Gu Hur, Seong Ki Ahn
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(3):95-101.   Published online September 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.3.95
  • 5,909 View
  • 182 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Ménière disease is a clinical syndrome characterized by the four major symptoms of episodic vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Sensorineural hearing loss, especially low frequency, is the characteristic type of audiogram in Ménière's disease. However, it is difficult to distinguish idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) with vertigo from the first attack of Ménière disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of progression into Ménière Disease from low frequency ISSNHL.
Methods
Two hundred eighty-three patients were included in this study. We classified the patients with ISSNHL according to the hearing loss in audiogram and analyzed how many of them actually progressed to Ménière disease based on diagnosis criteria.
Results
Among the 240 patients, 37.1% (89 patients) were confirmed low frequency ISSNHL and 14.6% (13 patients) of them were diagnosed with Meniere disease.
Conclusions
This study showed that the progression from low frequency ISSNHL to Ménière disease was higher than other frequency ISSNHL, as in other studies.
Prognosis of Sudden Low Frequency Hearing Loss during Long-term Follow-up
Ji Hyung Kim, Sang Hyun Kwak, Seong Hoon Bae, Sung Hunh Kim, Gi-Sung Nam
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(3):102-108.   Published online September 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.3.102
  • 7,840 View
  • 529 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The prognosis of sudden low frequency hearing loss (SLFHL) is relatively good, but recurrences of hearing loss and possible progression to Meniere’s disease is still a clinically important concern. This study was conducted to confirm the rate at which SLFHL proceeds to Meniere’s disease.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 160 SLFHL patients who were followed up for more than 6 months from September 2005 to August 2013. Progression, initial hearing level, recovery and recurrence of hearing loss were reviewed.
Results
106 patients (66.25%) had complete hearing recovery, 32 (20%) had recurrent hearing loss. Of the 32 recurrent group, 15 (9.38%) had progressed to Meniere’s disease after average of 1.7±1.4 years. The mean age of nonrecurrent group was higher than recurrent group (55.3±14.6 and 48.0±13.4, respectively, p=0.011). The threshold of 250Hz was significantly higher in the nonrecurrent group compared with recurrent group (p=0.047).
Conclusions
In patients with SLFHL, recurrence at relatively young age should be considered with the possibility of progression to Meniere’s disease.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Findings of Intravenous Gadolinium Inner Ear Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Acute Low-Tone Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    Hee Won Seo, Yikyung Kim, Hyung-Jin Kim, Won-Ho Chung, Young Sang Cho
    Clinical and Experimental Otorhinolaryngology.2023; 16(4): 334.     CrossRef
Case Reports
A Patient with Sudden Hearing Loss with Vertigo Showing Exclusive Posterior Semicircular Canal Abnormality
Ja Won Gu, Yong Gook Shin, Mee Hyun Song, Dae Bo Shim
Res Vestib Sci. 2017;16(4):161-166.   Published online December 15, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2017.16.4.161
  • 6,825 View
  • 157 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
It is known that about 30% of patients with sudden hearing loss present with vertigo or dizziness. In clinical practice, this is called sudden hearing loss with vertigo (SHLV) although definite diagnostic criteria have not been established. Dizziness in SHLV is known to be caused by the dysfunction of the vestibular end-organs as well as the superior vestibular nerve or both vestibular nerve divisions. Lesions of the inferior vestibular nerve or a single semicircular canal have also been reported in these patients. Herein we report a 71-year-old male patient with SHLV who demonstrated vestibular dysfunction involving only the posterior semicircular canal. The patient showed normal results in the bithermal caloric test and the cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials test as well as positional test. Video head impulse test showed decreased gain only in the posterior semicircular canal. This case is significant in showing that dizziness in SHLV patients can occur by an abnormality involving only a single semicircular canal.
A Case of Dolichoectasia of Vertebrobasilar Artery Presenting Simultaneous Bilateral Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss with Vertigo
Bum Ki Cho, Oh Joon Kwon, Dong Hyun Kim, Chang Woo Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2016;15(1):22-26.
  • 2,385 View
  • 127 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) develops usually in unilateral ear without known etiology. In contrast, bilateral sudden SNHL is mostly related to serious systemic diseases and have a severe hearing loss and poor prognosis compared than unilateral one. We describe here a 59-year-old man presented with a bilateral sudden SNHL and vertigo possibly attributed to dolichoectasia in vertebrobasilar artery, and discuss the possible mechanism.
Tullio Phenomenon Following Spontaneous Intralabyrinthine Gross Hemorrhage
Jae Won Choi, Jong Jun Kim, Young Hyo Kim, Hyun Woo Lim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(4):140-144.
  • 2,108 View
  • 9 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tullio phenomenon is a pattern of sound induced unsteadiness, imbalance or vertigo, associated with disturbances of oculomotor and postural control. As a possible cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss, intralabyrinthine gross hemorrhage has been reported in subjects with bleeding tendency. We report a case of spontaneous intralabyrinthine hemorrhage followed by presentation of Tullio phenomenon. A 35-year-old man presented with sudden left side hearing loss and vertigo. Audiometry results indicated left total deafness and magnetic resonance images revealed left intralabyrinthine hemorrhage. At 1 month after hearing loss, sound and pressure-induced vertigo and disequilibrium newly developed. Follow-up images indicated signs of fibrosis in the left labyrinth and nystagmography results showed induction of nystagmus according to the stapedial reflex. This case suggests possibility of Tullio phenomenon in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients.
A Case of Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Infarction Presenting with Sudden Hearing Loss and Vertigo
Sang Hyo Lee, Go Woon Kim, Bum Ki Cho, Chang Woo Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(4):136-139.
  • 2,408 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Sudden hearing loss and vertigo are the typical presentation of anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction, but may rarely occur in posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) infarction. Here we describe a 65-year-old man who presented with sudden hearing loss in his left ear and severe vertigo. The diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed acute infarction in the territory of PICA and cerebral angiography showed non-visualization of left vertebral artery. Sudden hearing loss and vertigo may be a presentation of PICA infarction.
A Case of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Infarction Initially Presented a Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss with a Normal Diffusion-weighted Brain MRI
Han Shin Kim, Jeong In Oh, Moon Il Park, Chang Woo Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2009;8(2):147-151.
  • 1,938 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A sudden hearing loss with vertigo may originate from vascular insufficiency and sometimes presents as a prodrome of anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction. Here we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who presented with a sudden onset of hearing loss in his right ear and severe, whirling type dizziness without associated neurological signs or symptoms. The diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal on initial presentation, but 4 weeks after the onset of symptoms, the patient developed ipsilateral facial paralysis and dysarthria. A follow-up MRI revealed acute infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, involving the right lateral pons, right middle cerebellar peduncle, and inferolateral cerebellum.
Two Cases of Sudden Hearing Loss With Vertigo as an Isolated Symptom of Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Infarction
See Young Park, Joong Wook Shin, Yong Jin Cho, Keun Sik Hong
J Korean Bal Soc. 2008;7(1):85-88.
  • 1,738 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Isolated sudden hearing loss with vertigo is usually peripheral origin. We report two cases with anterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction (AICA) manifesting sudden hearing loss with vertigo as an isolated symptom. Patient 1 was a 64-year-old man presented with right sided sudden hearing loss and vertigo accompanying horizontal beating nystagmus to the left. He had no other neurologic symptoms. MRI showed right AICA infarction involving lateral pons and middle cerebellar peduncle. Patient 2 was a hypertensive 56-year-old man. Left sided sudden hearing loss with vertigo was as an initial manifestation. Two days later, left sided facial palsy developed and MRI showed acute infarction in left lateral pons, middle cerebellar peduncle, and cerebellum. AICA infarction can be presented the hearing loss and vertigo as an isolated symptom and mimic the syndrome of peripheral origin.
A Case of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Sudden Hearing Loss during Recovery Phase of Vestibular Neuritis
Jong Dae Lee, Shi Chan Kim, Tae Kyeong Lee, Ki Bum Sung
J Korean Bal Soc. 2007;6(2):222-225.
  • 1,707 View
  • 16 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Although vestibular neuritis is defined as acute peripheral vestibulopathy without associated hearing loss, a handful of cases reported sudden hearing loss without concurrent vertigo during follow-up of vestibular neuritis. In addition, some patients show benign paroxysmal postional vertigo(BPPV) ipsilateral to the lesion side with various interval after vestibular neuritis, and they are considered to be “secondary” BPPV. Viral and vascular etiologies have been assumed for the vestibular neuritis but, both of those failed to explain exact pathomechanism so far. Authors experienced a case of sudden hearing loss with simultaneous ipsilateral BPPV after vestibular neuritis. There has been no report of concurrent of BPPV and sudden hearing loss after vestibular neuritis. Sequential viral activations are considered to be responsible for this case.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science