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Volume 12 Suppl 1 June 2011
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Symposium Is
History Taking of Dizzy Patients
Won-Ho Chung, Hayoung Byun
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S5-S10.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,181 View
  • 29 Download
PDF
Near Faint and Autonomic Symptoms
Hyun Ah Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S41-S45.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 958 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Orthostatic or autonomic dizziness is a common complaint in patient who seeking dizzy clinic. Patients with autonomic dizziness presented their dizziness as nonvertiginous dizziness, light-headedness, or fogginess in the head, which are usually exacerbated by physical exertion (but not specific changes in head position), straining (e.g., the Valsalva manuver), and orthostatic challenges. Orthostatic hypotension and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome are two common causes of autonomic dizziness. Because the vestibular system influences both respiratory and cardiovascular control, damage to the central or peripheral vestibular system also can cause to compromise the ability to adjust breathing and blood pressure during movement and changes in posture. Here the author reviews the clinical features of autonomic dizziness from various causes.
Symposium IIs
Classification of Vestibular Symptoms: Towards an International Classification of Vestibular Disorders
Jae-Han Park, Ji-Soo Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S49-S52.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,173 View
  • 46 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Explicit and uniform criteria are prerequisite for diagnosis and research of the vestibular disorders. Based on this consensus, in 2006, Barany Society initiated a committee for classification to pursue development of the first International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. To facilitate this process, the committee first defined the key vestibular symptoms as a basis for a subsequent classification of specific vestibular disorders. This is to review the committee’s definition on the vestibular symptoms, which was published in 2009.
Education in Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 2011 Ad Hoc Committee on Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy's Guideline
Sung Huhn Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S53-S54.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 893 View
  • 20 Download
PDF
Symposium Is
Associated Symptoms in Dizziness: Hearing Loss and Tinnitus
Mi Na Park, Myung-Whan Suh
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S16-S23.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,057 View
  • 18 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Dizziness is one of the most common complaint leading patients to visit their primary care physicians in older people. Despite its frequency, symptoms of dizziness can be difficult for the physician to categorize. Also many dizzy patients have hearing loss. The evaluation of patients with dizziness depends on not only the history of dizziness, physical findings but also basic laboratory tests such as audiometry, electrocochleogram, Cochlear hydrops analysis masking procedure, auditory brainstem response. Based on these considerations, this article outlines the interpretation of basic audiologic tests which is fundamental in evaluating dizzy patients.
History Taking of Headache Patients
Byung Kun Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S11-S15.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,231 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Headache is a most common complaint in neurological outpatient clinic. It has diverse underlying causes and numerous patterns of presentation. All headaches can be divided into primary and secondary headaches. More than ninety percent of headaches seen in clinical practice are due to primary headaches-most of them are tension type headache or migraine-where there are no confirmatory tests. A comprehensive history taking is critical for the correct diagnosis. Headache history taking is an art that needs constant practice. This review aims to discuss the way to go about taking a quick and correct history in headache patients.
Ataxia and Diplopia
Jae-Deuk Seo, In Soo Moon, Kwang-Dong Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S31-S40.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,690 View
  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Ataxia is a neurological sign consisting of lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements, which may result from abnormalities in different parts of the nervous system including the cerebellum and its connecting pathway, proprioceptive sensory pathway, and vestibular system. In the diagnosis of disorders characterized by cerebellar ataxia, the mode of onset, rate of development, and degree of permanence of the ataxia are of particular importance. In adults, paraneoplastic and demyelinating cases account for the largest proportion of subacute onset, and hereditary forms are the usual cause of very slowly progressive and chronic ones. The last category of genetic ataxias now constitute a large and heterogeneous group for which the basis has been established in most cases. Misalignment of the visual axes-strabismus-causes the two images of a seen object to fall on noncorresponding areas of the two retinas, which usually causes diplopia, the sensation of seeing an object at two different locations in space. Accurate diagnosis of diplopia and strabismus require detailed history on the symptomatology and ocular motor examination consisting of assessment of the range of eye movements, subjective diplopia testing, and cover and alternate cover tests.
How to Evaluate Associated Symptoms in Dizziness: Hyperacusis, Otorrhea and Other Ear Symptoms
Myung Hoon Yoo, Hong Ju Park
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S24-S30.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 2,053 View
  • 56 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A carefully obtained history is most important when evaluating a dizzy patient. Specific symptoms guide the examination and workup, and it is critical for the physician to focus on associated symptoms, in addition to the dizziness complaint itself. Hyperacusis accompanied with vertigo, may be a sign of superior canal dehiscence syndrome, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, perilymphatic fistula, labyrinthine concussion, and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Otorrhea, usually a sign of otitis media, can suggest labyrinthine fistula or labyrinthitis as a cause of dizziness. This review describes the evaluation of hyperacusis, autophony, otorrhea and other otologic symptoms (except hearing loss and tinnitus) in patients with dizziness, and related causes of dizziness.
Special Lectures I
평형의학의 어제와 오늘
Kyung Cheon Chung
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S57-S57.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 838 View
  • 6 Download
PDF
Special Lectures II
Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Manifestations and Pathophysiology
Joseph M. Furman
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S61-S69.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 963 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Vestibular migraine (VM) is now accepted as a common neurotologic disorder. VM is a migraine variant that presents with vertigo, imbalance and head movement intolerance in association with migrainous features. Diagnostic criteria for VM are based on the patient’s history and have recently been published by the Barany Society in collaboration with the International Headache Society. Physical examination and laboratory testing between episodes of VM are usually normal. The pathophysiology of VM is based on central nervous system pathways and neurochemistry common to headache and vestibular function. At this time, treatment of VM is empirical and is based on expert opinion rather than controlled trials.
Symposium IIIs
Diagnosis and Treatment of Vertical Canal Benign Paroxysomal Positional Vertigo
Min Gu Lee, Sung Kwang Hong
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S73-S76.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,368 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is inner ear disorder caused by a displacement by otoconia from the utricle into semicircular canal (SCC). It is usually present as a definite vertigo spell induced by change in head position. Even though the posterior canal is by far most frequent, BPPV can involve any SCC. The diagnosis is confirmed by typical clinical presentation and positional tests. The aim of the review article was to provide a current opinion regarding vertical canal BPPV.
Treatment of Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Sun-Young Oh
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S77-S81.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,347 View
  • 40 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Several methods of physiotherapy have been advanced for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo involving horizontal semicircular canal (HC-BPPV). In this review article, the diagnosis and therapeutic maneuvers for HC-BPPV including recently published several randomized controlled trials are described.
Central Positional Vertigo
Dong Uk Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S85-S88.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,184 View
  • 41 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Positional vertigo and positional nystagmus are usually due to peripheral vestibular disorders; there is no doubt that the most common etiology is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. However, it should be cautious that the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a findings of positional vertigo or positional nystagmus. In this review, we discuss uncommon causes of positional vertigo or positional nystagmus that result from lesion or dysfunction of central vestibular system, not peripheral vestibular structures.
Erratum
Electrophysiology of Vestibular System
Eunjin Park, Kyu-Sung Kim, Jihoon Jo
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S89-S89.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,098 View
  • 11 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Electrophysiological study of the vestibular nerve cells how to fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals from a variety of research results. However, the small number of experimental animals used in this study toward higher organisms is inconvenient. Thus, in vitro or in vivo experiments using a mouse or a rat, electrophysiological studies in the vestibular organs of the study, a statistically significant level, many of the experimental results can be achieved. It is easier to prepare for dealing with experimental laboratory animals. Gene mouse mutants related to the genetic map of the mouse study, there has been significant progress, as well as vestibular and auditory development has become. In conclusion, applied or basic research associated with the vestibular nerve in rodents, such as rats and electrophysiological studies, considering the characteristics of the vestibular system, and how the mouse is a need for the development of an experimental model. In this paper, we briefly explained the common electrophysiological studies, experimental methods, and applied on the vestibular nerve afferent examples.
Symposium III
Complicated Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Atypical, Multi-Canal, and Transitional Type
Gyu Cheol Han
Res Vestib Sci. 2013;12(Suppl 1):S82-S84.   Published online June 1, 2013
  • 1,791 View
  • 86 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is diagnosed when vertigo and typical nystagmus are elicited by the positional maneuvers. Otherwise, the others unexplainable nystagmus beyond the typical form was called “atypical form” BPPV. The reports of atypical form in BPPV have been decreased according to expansion of knowledge or experience about various BPPV. Atypical BPPV include the switch or transitional, bilateral, and multi-canal type BPPV. Recently those complicated BPPV have been investigated by 3D video nystagmography and high resolution magnetic resonance image. Although we could not fully understand the etiology and pathophysiology of BPPV, These efforts to define the atypical BPPV should be helpful to grow up background knowledge of physician.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science