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Volume 10 (1); March 2011
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Review
Characteristics of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials
Jae Chul Yoo, Ja Won Koo
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):1-6.
  • 1,785 View
  • 20 Download
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Original Articles
Contralateral Suppression of Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission in Vestibular Neuritis
Hoon Young Woo, Jung Hyeob Sohn, Young Sam Yoo, Jeong Hwan Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):7-11.
  • 1,854 View
  • 13 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: The etiology of vestibular neuritis is unknown. Many investigators have suggested that this condition spares the inferior vestibular nerve system. However, others have reported that the lesion sometimes affects the inferior vestibular nerve system based on vestibular evoked myogenic potential. The function of the inferior vestibular nerve was studied in acute vestibular neuritis by monitoring medial olivocochlear bundle (MOCB) function. Under normal conditions, contralateral acoustic stimulation has inhibitory effects on ipsilateral otoacoustic emissions through the MOCB. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients that presented with dizziness and spontaneous nystagmus, and were confirmed to have acute vestibular neuritis by rotatory chair and caloric testing were enrolled in this study. We evaluated the evoked otoacoustic emissions with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation in both ears in all patients. The percent loss of normal inhibitory action on otoacoustic emissions was determined in the normal and affected ears. Results: All patients showed inhibitory effects in response to contralateral acoustic stimulation on evoked otoacoustic emissions in normal ears. Fifteen patients (75%) had an absence of contralateral suppression of otoacoustic emissions on the affected side. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest the presence of dysfunction of the MOCB in patients with acute vestibular neuritis.
Measuring the Behavioral Parameters of Mouse Following Unilateral Labyrinthectomy in Round Free Field Using an Infrared Lamp and a Simple Webcam Camera
Mi Joo Kim, Hyun Jung Hwang, Seung Won Chung, Gyu Cheol Han
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):12-18.
  • 1,751 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: In this research, movements of mouse after labyrinthectomy were analyzed to determine the degree of vestibular dysfunction and compensation. Materials and Methods: By using an infrared lamp, mouse movements were recorded for 100 seconds in a dark room. The experimental area was manufactured as a circular space with a diameter of 60 cm. The movements of five mice labyrinthectomized on right side were observed and recorded at 3 hours, 9 hours and 120 hours after the operation, and also the ten mice of control group. Results: The differences between the total moving distances and the rotating angle from the origin that set the center of round field between groups were analyzed with pictures of 1 frame per second. It is concluded that all 4 groups show significant differences between its mean rotation angle and total moving distances statistically. At 9 hours after right labyrinthectomy, mice tended to turn clockwise; but at 120 hours, there was no significant difference between clockwise and counter-clockwise rotation. Conclusion: Measuring the movement of mouse in round free field can be the proper method to determine the degree of vestibular dysfunction and vestibular compensation. This test was time-saving and cost-effective method.
Diagnostic Value of Cochlear Hydrops Analysis Masking Procedure in Meniere's Disease in Comparison with Electrocochleography
Ju Sang Lee, Eun Sun Park, Sung Kwang Hong, Jung Hak Lee, Hyo Jeong Lee, Hyung Jong Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):19-25.
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  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: Patients with Meniere’s disease often present with a great variety of symptoms, especially at the onset of the disease. However, there is no single test that is definitive for making the diagnosis of Meniere’s disease. Recently, a new diagnostic test, the cochlear hydrops analysis masking procedure (CHAMP) was introduced as a test for endolymphatic hydrops. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of CHAMP test in Meniere’s disease in comparison with that of electrocochleography. Materials and Methods: The CHAMP test and electrocochleography were simultaneously performed in 14 cases of definite Meniere’s disease and 8 normal healthy volunteers (16 ears). Positive criteria were defined as being more than 0.35 in summating potential/action potential (SP/AP) ratio, 0.3 ms or less in latency delay and 0.95 or less in complex amplitude ratio. Measured parameters from each test were compared between the groups, and sensitivity and specificity of each test in diagnosing Meniere’s disease were calculated. Results: There was no significant difference in the SP/AP ratio of electrocochleography between the Meniere’s disease and control groups. In CHAMPtest, the latency delay was shorter and the complex amplitude ratio was smaller (p<0.001). While taking positive results from both test parameters, the sensitivity and specificity of CHAMP test were 85.7% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusion: The CHAMP seems to be a clinically useful tool in diagnosing Meniere’s disease and might be better than electrocochleography to detect endolymphatic hydrops.
C-fos Expression of Vestibular Nucleus in C57BL/6 Mouse Under the 7 Tesla Ultra High Magnetic Field
Mi Joo Kim, Min Joo Jung, Ji Hye Bae, Eun Ji Lee, Duk Hyun Kim, Gyu Cheol Han
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):26-29.
  • 1,769 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: A typical side effect of super high magnetic field is dizziness and it is expected that 7 Tesla (T) super high magnetic field will have temporary influence on vestibular nucleus. Prevalence rate of dizziness generally increases with advancing years, so this study discusses whether the influence of 7 T super high magnetic field differs depending on the age. Materials and Methods: C57BL/6 mice weighting from 10-40 g were categorized into 4-week-old and 16-week-old groups. They were exposed to 7 T magnetic field and immunohistochemical staining was done to observe expression of c-fos protein in vestibular nucleus of mice. Results: Control group with normal vestibular system did not show c-fos protein. However, mice exposed to 7 T magnetic field showed c-fos expression selectively on medial and lateral parts of vestibular nucleus and there was no significant difference of c-fos expression between both sides (p<0.05). There was statistically significant difference between the different age group: 16-week-old mice group showed higher number of cells expressing c-fos protein than 4-week-old mice group did (p<0.05). Conclusion: It is statistically significant that 7 T super high magnetic field is more influential to older age group.
Age and Gender Specific Reference Value of Ocular Torsion by Using Funduscope in Korean
Byoung Youn Ko, Jeong Seok Choi, Kyu Sung Kim, Hoseok Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):30-33.
  • 1,764 View
  • 8 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background and Objectives: Ocular torsion may be a result of vestibulopathy. The funduscopy is the most reliable method of measuring an ocular torsion. However, the reference value of ocular torsion in Korean is available at only limited ages. Therefore, we analyzed the angle of ocular torsion more age-specific than previous study. Materials and Methods: We used the fundus photograph of health check-up visitor. And age and sex specific average angle of ocular torsion was measured. Results: The right and left average angle of ocular torsion were 7.7±3.6°, 5.3±3.0°, respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference in age or sex specific angle of ocular torsion. Conclusion: This result might give an aid to evaluating the function of otolithic organ by measurement of ocular torsion.
Case Reports
A Case of Facial Palsy Developed after Vestibular Neuritis Involving Superior Vestibular Nerve
Young Gil Ko, Seok Min Hong, Chan Hum Park, Jun Ho Lee
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):34-37.
  • 2,475 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Vestibular neuritis is generally thought to be caused by a viral or postviral inflammatory disorder of vestibular structures. But there is no definite evidence to explain this pathophysiological mechanism until now. We experienced an unusual case of 34-year-old man who presented with facial paralysis several days after vertigo of a whirling nature. We report a case of facial palsy developed in succession of ipsilateral vestibular neuritis involving superior vestibular nerve which may infer the viral pathophysiology for the vestibular neuritis with a brief literature review.
A Case of Bilateral Horizontal Semicircular Canal Dysplasia with Normal Cochlea: Three Dimensional Volume Rendering Image Using MR CISS Sequence
Jae Hwan Choi, Hak Jin Kim, Han Young Jung, Kwang Dong Choi
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):38-41.
  • 1,823 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Congenital inner ear malformations are frequently found in patients with sensorineural hearing loss, but isolated vestibular anomalies with normal cochlear development have been rarely reported. We report a 20-year-old man with recurrent dizziness and disequlibrium without hearing impairment. Neuro-otological evaluations showed a left peripheral vestibulopathy with normal hearing function. Three dimensional volume rendering image using magnetic resonance constructive interference in steady state sequence demonstrated isolated vestibular anomalies involving bilateral horizontal semicircular canals. Isolated vestibular anomalies might not be as rare as previously thought among patients with recurrent dizziness, and should be carefully evaluated through various imaging techniques
A Case of Acute Serous Labyrinthitis Complicated by Chronic Otitis Media Showing Atypical Nystagmus Pattern
Hyun Woo Park, Seong Ki Ahn, Dong Gu Hur
Res Vestib Sci. 2011;10(1):42-45.
  • 2,239 View
  • 80 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Serous or suppurative labyrinthitis is one of the intratemporal complications of acute or chronic otitis media. Labyrinthitis can occur by meningogenic or hematogenous infection. Major symptoms of labyrinthitis are vertigo and hearing loss. The disease progresses in two phases; serous labyrinthitis, so called toxic labyrinthitis, and suppurative labyrinthitis. If labyrinthitis treated at serous phase, hearing could be saved. But, if the disease progressed to suppurative phase, hearing loss is difficult to recover. Therefore it is very important to distinguish these two phases of labyrinthitis when treating the patient. In general, the direction of nystagmus during labyrinthitis is helpful sign to distinguish these two phases. We report here on an unusual case of acute serous labyrinthitis complicated with chronic otitis media showing atypical pattern with a review of the related literatures.

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science