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Case Reports
A Case of Delayed Audiovestibulopathy after Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke
Hyun Su Lee, Eun Kyung Jeon, Dong Hwan Kwon, Tae Hoon Kong
Res Vestib Sci. 2023;22(3):77-82.   Published online September 15, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2023.22.3.77
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  • 33 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Distinguishing central and peripheral causes of dizziness is vital. A case is presented where a 42-year-old man with a history of posterior circulation ischemic stroke developed acute unilateral vestibulopathy with hearing loss. Clinical examination revealed signs of vestibular dysfunction on the left side. Audiometry confirmed deafness on the left, but imaging ruled out new central issues. The patient was diagnosed with audiovestibulopathy and treated with steroids, antiviral agents, intratympanic injections, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hearing loss persisted, but dizziness improved with vestibular rehabilitation. Poststroke patients should be closely monitored for peripheral complications. Further research should explore the benefits of antiplatelet therapy in vascular-related conditions, even without clear central lesions.
Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Mimicking Bilateral Ménièreʼs Disease: A Case Report
Hong-Ju Kim, Yoon-Gi Choi, Hyun Ji Kim, Kyu-Sung Kim
Res Vestib Sci. 2018;17(1):28-34.   Published online March 15, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21790/rvs.2018.17.1.28
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  • 140 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED) is a rare disease, accounting for <1% of all cases of hearing impairment or dizziness. It is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) or vestibular dysfunction that results from an immunemediated process. Clinical features of AIED is SNHL that progresses over weeks to month with fluctuating hearing symptoms. Because there are no diagnostic laboratory and clinical feature, response to immunosuppressive therapy were important for diagnosis of AIED. Many diseases such as sudden SNHL and Meniere disease may also mimic AIED, a broad differential must be maintained in patients suspected of having AIED. We report a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with sudden hearing loss and vertigo. We could diagnose her as AIED with systemic lupus erythematous. The symptoms were improved treated with steroids.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sensorineural Hearing Loss of Suspected Autoimmune Etiology: Two Cases of Cogan’s Syndrome
    Jungmin Ahn, Brian Kim, Kyoung Rai Cho, Young-Soo Chang
    Korean Journal of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Nec.2021; 64(12): 943.     CrossRef
  • A Case of Autoimmune Sensorineural Hearing Loss Responding to Cytotoxic Agent
    Yong Woo Lee, Jin Lee, Min-Beom Kim, Sun O Chang
    Korean Journal of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Nec.2019; 62(8): 470.     CrossRef

Res Vestib Sci : Research in Vestibular Science